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Click through the photos to see some of the activities in the evolution of the hive 2014. Read below for details of each week's themes and projects.

 

July 7–11: Knots, Nature, Craft

Week 1 Theme: Using artist Orly Genger’s enormous, crocheted rope sculpture Red, Yellow and Blue as a jumping off point, campers explored what happens when traditional crafts get BIG–and take over the landscape. They discovered unseen patterns in nature, extraordinary uses for household materials, super-sized scale, and surprising new art activities through responding to the landscape with materials and movement, sculpting with rope and pool noodles, and much more! 

Week 1 Project:  Campers worked together to create a giant rope spider webs and a pool-noodle skep (aka beehive) in the Sculpture Park. Throughout the week, they explored insects and their habitats, as they learned finger knitting, crochet, and weaving techniques on both small and large scales.

The BIG Idea: Working with contemporary art connects the hive’s weekly themes to real world ideas, unbounded creativity, and inspiring innovation. Our instructors are artists, inventors, naturalists, and/or makers who love exploring and sharing the exciting intersections among scientific, historical, and social ideas through art and nature. Each camper’s personal interests and unique abilities will complement those of new friends, while everyone learns from each other.

 

July 14–18: Flora, Fauna, Fakes

Week 2 Theme: Using artist Roberley Bell’s colorful, blobby world on the Museum’s rooftop gallery as a starting point, campers discovered surprising relationships between natural and sculpted furniture and forms. They investigated the variety of flora and fauna (plants, insects, and animals) of deCordova’s 30-acre Sculpture Park and zoomed in on its mini-environments to find inspiration for creative plant-forms that connect the scientific with science-fiction.

Week 2 Project: What would a fantastical greenhouse of the future look like? Campers worked together to design and construct house frames to harvest both real and imagined plants. Working with an assemblage of unusual materials, casting in plaster and foam, building with string and tubes, and more, they discovered a variety of ways to fabricate fanciful flora to populate a futuristic greenhouse.

The BIG Idea: Working with contemporary art connects the hive’s weekly themes to real world ideas, unbounded creativity, and inspiring innovation. Our instructors are artists, inventors, naturalists, and/or makers who love exploring and sharing the exciting intersections among scientific, historical, and social ideas through art and nature. Each camper’s personal interests and unique abilities will complement those of new friends, while everyone learns from each other.

 

July 21–25: Spaces, Stories, Tools

Week 3 Theme:Using artist Tim DeChristopher’s stone, wood, and miscellaneous object contraption The Fruit of Our Labors as a jumping off point, campers discovered how sculpture can tell a story of a people and a place. They explored the history of their woodland site through casting archaeological finds, surveying the land, producing characters and stories, creating biographical installations, building a fort, designing useful tools, and much more!

Week 3 Project:What does a woodland workshop look like? Imagine stumbling upon a workshop in the woods–how could you tell who lives there, what they do, and why they create? Discover various ways to design pulleys and levers, make tools and toys from wood and stone, and work with natural materials to construct a home and workplace.

The BIG Idea: Working with contemporary art connects the hive’s weekly themes to real world ideas, unbounded creativity, and inspiring innovation. Our instructors are artists, inventors, naturalists, and/or makers who love exploring and sharing the exciting intersections among scientific, historical, and social ideas through art and nature. Each camper’s personal interests and unique abilities will complement those of new friends, while everyone learns from each other.

 

July 28–August 1: Landscape, Language, Design

Week 4 Theme: Using artist Lesley Dill’s alphabetical clothing sculpture as a starting point, campers explored how language can become three-dimensional works of art. Campers discovered deCordova’s lyrical, art-filled landscape as inspiration to assemble words and materials into poetic objects, make sculptures from grass seed and collages from used books, compose their own poetic t-shirts, design their own text and symbol-filled environment, and more!

Week 4 Project: How can words and art be combined to create a poetic garden? Imagine text tumbling down a hillside, turning promotional t-shirts into statues, building with giant letters and words, and casting rhymes into concrete. Collect words through listening and recording and create a soundscape that echoes through the Sculpture Park. Discover how artistic inspiration can come from poetry found in nature, writing, and art, and how words, images, and objects can combine to create both thoughtful and amusing experiences for others.

The BIG Idea: Working with contemporary art connects the hive’s weekly themes to real world ideas, unbounded creativity, and inspiring innovation. Our instructors are artists, inventors, naturalists, and/or makers who love exploring and sharing the exciting intersections among scientific, historical, and social ideas through art and nature. Each camper’s personal interests and unique abilities will complement those of new friends, while everyone learns from each other. Campers do not need to know how to read or write to participate in this week!